Dozens remember loved ones in Hospice Winter Walk – 100 Mile House Free Press

About 120 people turned out for the second annual 100 Mile Hospice Winter Walk last Friday.

Over the course of four hours, as the sun set, South Cariboo residents young and old walked the candlelit trail beside the 100 Mile Marsh. Some walked to remember friends, others to remember family. Others simply walked to read the inspirational quotes put up by volunteers from the 100 Mile District Hospice Palliative Care Society.

The event was held to provide people with a chance to mourn their loved ones, especially with no public venues available during COVID-19. Paper bags were placed strategically along the path, allowing people to drop off a photo, a note, or other tributes to those they have lost. About 40 notes and cards were collected from the bags and later burned, according to Sarah Smith, Hospice’s bereavement coordinator.

“I think we’re going to make it into an annual event. If the need is there it’s worth it,” Smith said. “If it helps one person, it’s worth it.”

Maxine Dillabough, who volunteered at the event, later walked the trail with her husband Harvey. She said an event like this is especially important during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It was well-received last year so I think it can only get bigger and better next year,” Maxine said. “We wanted to do hot chocolate but because of COVID we couldn’t.”

Harvey joked he only came out because Maxine dragged him to the walk but upon arrival found the event to be meaningful. Many of the sayings along the walk hit home for him, making him think of his late mother and Maxine’s late father and brother.

“I think it’s a great idea, they should do this every year,” Harvey said.

Further down the trail, Angela Hollander was walking with Lisa Smith. Hollander said she found out about the walk on Facebook.

“We’ve lost people so we thought why not come out and do the walk?” Hollander said. “We knew Sue Graham who passed away recently and my mother-in-law’s partner passed away a couple of years ago.”

Hollander said she appreciated all the work Hospice had done to mark the trail. The candles and quotes immediately impressed upon her the importance of the walk.

“You don’t want to forget these people. Everybody plays a role in your life and you should honor them whether they’re here or not.”


patrick.davies@100milefreepress.net
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Annie McKave deposits a note into a bag containing an electric candle at the 100 Mile Hospice Winter Walk. McKave said she was walking to remember several friends who passed away last year. (Patrick Davies photo – 100 MIle Free Press)

100 Mile District Hospice Palliative Care Society executive director Tracy Haddow takes part in the 100 Mile Hospice Winter Walk with her husband Mike Royal.  (Patrick Davies photo - 100 MIle Free Press)

100 Mile District Hospice Palliative Care Society executive director Tracy Haddow takes part in the 100 Mile Hospice Winter Walk with her husband Mike Royal. (Patrick Davies photo – 100 MIle Free Press)

Maxine and Harvey Dillabough walked the 100 Mile Hospice Winter Walk Trail several times on Friday.  (Patrick Davies photo - 100 MIle Free Press)

Maxine and Harvey Dillabough walked the 100 Mile Hospice Winter Walk Trail several times on Friday. (Patrick Davies photo – 100 MIle Free Press)

Maxine and Harvey Dillabough walked the 100 Mile Hospice Winter Walk Trail several times on Friday.  (Patrick Davies photo - 100 MIle Free Press)

Maxine and Harvey Dillabough walked the 100 Mile Hospice Winter Walk Trail several times on Friday. (Patrick Davies photo – 100 MIle Free Press)

Angela Hollander and Lisa Smith participated in the 100 Mile Hospice Winter Walk after the sun set on Friday.  (Patrick Davies photo - 100 MIle Free Press)

Angela Hollander and Lisa Smith participated in the 100 Mile Hospice Winter Walk after the sun set on Friday. (Patrick Davies photo – 100 MIle Free Press)

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