It’s the ‘Ides of March,’ but what does that mean?

It’s the ‘Ides of March,’ but what does that mean?

Shakespeare made it famous, but what is it?

“A soothsayer bids you beware the ides of March.” If you studied Shakespeare at all in high school or college — and let’s be honest, you know you did, even if you forgot — the phrase may ring a bell. of March.”In Act 1, Scene 2 of the bard’s tragedy “Julius Caesar,” a soothsayer appears in a crowd as Brutus and Caesar are pushed by the press of people. It would become, in the play at least, a prophecy, as on the “ides,” March 15, Caesar was assassinated. Julius Caesar was immensely popular with the people of Rome – the people, as in the masses. He managed a massive expansion of the Roman republic and attained the title of emperor, essentially dictator for life, in 44 BCE While the people loved him, many in the Roman Senate did not. As many as 60 conspirators are suspected to have taken part in the plot to kill Caesar. For sure 40 senators stabbed him, reportedly 23 times, in the halls of the senate where Caesar’s bodyguards were not allowed. So what do “ides” have to do with anything? It is less about prophecy and really just a simple word for a description . In Latin, the phrase Ides of March is “Idus Martias.” According to Dictionary.com, the phrase “ides of March” is usually the middle of the month, the timing of the first full moon. The “ides” were the times the full moon fell on the 15th. That’s not every month, it’s actually March, May, July and October. It’s the 13th day on the other months. In that era (and beyond) the full moon was storied for its own omens. That could be why it’s got such significance in the prophecy in Shakespeare’s play. It is that assassination of Caesar that gives the day its superstitious vibe. Caesar had taken over as dictator of the empire until his death from him. The senators, who thought they would return to the republic of old, had not counted on the love the people of Rome had for Caesar. A civil war broke out in the wake of Caesar’s death, and the actual republic as they knew it was effectively dead at that point. The play is known for its quotes, from this one, to the final words of Caesar, in the play at least, “Et tu, Brute?” Translated, “And you, Brutus?” If you remember your studies, Brutus was a friend of Caesar’s who joined the conspiracy and added to the 23 cuts. However, like the soothsayer and the line “beware the ides of March,” Caesar likely never uttered those words. But they make for great drama. Until then, you might want to watch out, just to be safe, on this ides of March.

“A soothsayer bids you beware the ides of March.”

If you studied Shakespeare at all in high school or college — and let’s be honest, you know you did, even if you forgot — the phrase may ring a bell.

“Beware the ideas of March.”

In Act 1, Scene 2 of the bard’s tragedy “Julius Caesar,” a soothsayer appears in a crowd as Brutus and Caesar are pushed by the press of people. It would become, in the play at least, a prophecy, as on the “ides,” March 15, Caesar was assassinated.

Julius Caesar was immensely popular with the people of Rome – the people, as in the masses. He managed a massive expansion of the Roman republic and attained the title of emperor, essentially dictator for life, in 44 BCE While the people loved him, many in the Roman Senate did not.

As many as 60 conspirators are suspected to have taken part in the plot to kill Caesar. For sure 40 senators stabbed him, reportedly 23 times, in the halls of the senate where Caesar’s bodyguards were not allowed.

So what do “ides” have to do with anything?

It is less about prophecy and really just a simple word for a description. In Latin, the phrase Ides of March is “Idus Martias.”

According to Dictionary.com, the phrase “ides of March” is usually the middle of the month, the timing of the first full moon. The “ides” were the times the full moon fell on the 15th. That’s not every month, it’s actually March, May, July and October. It’s the 13th day on the other months. In that era (and beyond) the full moon was storied for its own omens. That could be why it’s got such significance in the prophecy in Shakespeare’s play.

It is that assassination of Caesar that gives the day its superstitious vibe. Caesar had taken over as dictator of the empire until his death from him. The senators, who thought they would return to the republic of old, had not counted on the love the people of Rome had for Caesar. A civil war broke out in the wake of Caesar’s death from him, and the actual republic as they knew it was effectively dead at that point.

The play is known for its quotes, from this one, to the final words of Caesar, in the play at least, “Et tu, Brute?” Translated, “And you, Brutus?” If you remember your studies, Brutus was a friend of Caesar’s who joined the conspiracy and added to the 23 cuts.

However, like the soothsayer and the line “beware the ides of March,” Caesar likely never uttered those words. But they make for great drama.

Until then, you might want to watch out, just to be safe, on this ides of March.

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