Creator of Westbrook art installation asking what color are our memories

Maine artist looks to explore your memories through colors



A LOCAL ARTIST IS ASKING PEOPLE,,, “WHAT COLOR ARE YOUR MEMORIES”? IT’S ALL PART OF A VY ER LARGE, INTERACTIVE A RT EXHIBIT BY USM’S ARTIST IN RESIDENCE, THAT’S CURRENTLY SHOWING IN WESTBROOK…. WMTW NEWS EIGHT’S STEVE MINICH TAKES US THERE IN THIS WEEK’S, HOMETOWN MAINE… (– NATS 00 -23-56) — DOOR OPENS, ‘IMMEDIATELY COL’,OR STEP, STEP (00-25-09 AUDIO ) “SO I BUILT A NEIGHBORHOOD IN A NEIGHBORHOOD ESSENTIALLY”. IT’S ONE VERY COLORFUL NEIGHBORHOOD…. INSIDE TH FISORMER SCHOOL GYMNASIUM ON MAIN STREET WESTBROOK,, ARTIST, AND AM STACEY CURTIS, HAS BUILT ONE OF HER MOST AMBITIOUS INTERACTIVE INSTALLATIONS,,,, NINE HOUSES,, NINE COLORS,,, EACH, SHE HOPES WILL EVOKE SOME SPECIAL MEMORY… (00-36-) 17 “MY HOPE IS THAT PEOPLE WILL ENTER EACH COLOR SPECIFICOU HSE, FOR EXAMPLE THE RED ONE THAT I BUILT, AND TO SIT IN THE HOUSE, SIT AT THE DESK A ND JUST BE WITH THEMSELVES AND WRITE DOWN MEMORIES THAT COME TO MIND WHEN THEY’RE SURROUNDED BY THATOL COR.” AMY CALLS HER EXHIBIT, ‘THE COLOR OF MEMORY’….. IT ALSO AWDRS FROM HER OWN FI YVEEAR PHYSICAL AND MENTAL STRUGGLE WITH BRA IN DAMAGE BUGROHT ON BY UNTREATED LYME DISEASE…. BUT,, WHILE LIMITING W HO LONG AND HARD SHE CAN WO RK — AMY HAS NEVER LOST THE ABILITY TO CREATE AND CONVEY HER CONCEPTS…. (00-41-) 57 “I JUST COULDN’T CONTROL MY BY ODAND KIND OF WHAT MY BRAIN WAS SHOWING ME , I COULD STILL HAVE ACTIVE CREATION IN MY BRAIN.” –NATS OF WALKING AROUND — STROLLING THROUGH AMY’S MAKE SHIFT NEIGHBORHOOD — YOU CAN SEE THE INTRICATE DETAILS OF EACH HOUSE D AN THE DIVERSE ARRAY OF — STUFF LITTERED AROUND THEM,,, (00-37-35) “I WANTED TO CREATE SOME VARIETY IN THIS NEIGHBORHOOD.” STILL IT’S THE BRILLIANT COLORS S HOPHEES WILL FUEL MEMORIES THAT VISITORS MIGHT WRITE DOWN TO SHARE PUBLICLY… (00-32-5 0) ‘GREEN IS MY FATHES R’ COLOR,, AND DAYS SPENT PLAYING GAMES WITH HIM’.. – -WIPE– (00-34-06) ‘I WAS BORN ON ST. PATRICK’S DAY SO MY D DA SERVED ME GREEN MILK ON MY BIRTHDAY EVERY YEAR.” THE COLLECTION OF THOSE MEMORIES AMY PLANS TO E ON DAY PUBLISH IN NINE DIFFERENT BOOKS — ONE FOR EACH COLOR.. (00-43-38) “EACH A COLOR SPECIFIC ANTHOLOGY OF THE MEMORIESER WE SHARED FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD FOR THIS PROJECT.” SO WHAT COLOR ARE OUR MEMORIES? THAT’S THE SIMPLE QUESTION AMY HOPES WE MIGHT FIGURE OUT BY JUST WANDERING THROUGHEH R LITTLE NEIGHBORHOO.. D. COLOR SPLASHED WORK OF LITTLE NEIGHBORHOOD… A ART…. (00-36-3 9) “I ENCOURAGE PEOPLE TO WRITE A MEMORY IN EACH BK OO SO UP TO NINE MEMORIES ONE IN EACH OF THE DIFFERENT COLORS” .. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SEE THE SHOW,,, IT’S OPEN DAILY FROM 10 UNTIL FIVE AT THE PRES

Maine artist looks to explore your memories through colors

A Maine artist is asking people what color their memories are. It’s part of a large, interactive art exhibit by University of Southern Maine’s artist in resident that’s currently showing in Westbrook. Inside a former school gymnasium on Main Street, Westbrook, Amy Stacey Curtis has built one of her most ambitious interactive installations. There are nine houses in nine colors. Each she hopes will evoke some special memory.”My hope is that people will enter each color specific house, for example the red one that I built, and to sit in the house, sit at the desk and just be with themselves and write down memories that come to mind when they’re surrounded by that color,” Curtis said.Curtis calls her exhibit, ‘The Color of Memory’.It draws from her own five year physical and mental struggle with brain damage brought on by untreated Lyme disease While limiting how long and hard she can work, Curtis has never lost the ability to create and convey her concepts.”I just couldn’t control my body and kind of what my brain was showing me, I could still have active creation in my brain,” Curtis said. Strolling through Curtis’ make shift neighborhood, you can see the intricate details of each house and the diverse array of the stuff littered around them,Still it’s the brilliant colors she hopes will fuel memories that visitors might write down to share publicly.Curtis pl Ella ans to publish the collection of those memories in nine different books – one for each color.”Each a color specific anthology of the memories that were shared from all over the world for this project,” Curtis said. “I encourage people to write a memory in each book so up to nine memories one in each of the different colors.”

A Maine artist is asking people what color their memories are. It’s part of a large, interactive art exhibit by University of Southern Maine’s artist in resident that’s currently showing in Westbrook.

Inside a former school gymnasium on Main Street, Westbrook, Amy Stacey Curtis has built one of her most ambitious interactive installations.

There are nine houses in nine colors. Each she hopes will evoke some special memory.

“My hope is that people will enter each color specific house, for example the red one that I built, and to sit in the house, sit at the desk and just be with themselves and write down memories that come to mind when they’re surrounded by that color,” Curtis said.

Curtis calls her exhibit, ‘The Color of Memory’. It draws from her own five year physical and mental struggle with brain damage brought on by untreated Lyme disease.

While limiting how long and hard she can work, Curtis has never lost the ability to create and convey her concepts.

“I just couldn’t control my body and kind of what my brain was showing me, I could still have active creation in my brain,” Curtis said.

Strolling through Curtis’ make shift neighborhood, you can see the intricate details of each house and the diverse array of the stuff littered around them,

Still it’s the brilliant colors she hopes will fuel memories that visitors might write down to share publicly.

Curtis plans to publish the collection of those memories in nine different books — one for each color.

“Each a color specific anthology of the memories that were shared from all over the world for this project,” Curtis said. “I encourage people to write a memory in each book so up to nine memories one in each of the different colors.”

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