Books: Discover the 10 best of April to add to your ‘To Be Read’ pile

“Spring in the world! And all things are made new!” declared Richard Hovey in his 1892 poem “Spring.”

The books recommended by our reviewers this month include novels about characters who reinvent themselves, reject the status quo, and refuse to mold themselves to society’s limited expectations. By embracing their quirky individuality, they find hidden depths and strength.

Why We Wrote This

Our reviewers’ picks for this month include books about challenging sexism, moving out of complacency, and recognizing the impact of today’s decisions on the future. And, for poetry month, a collection of poems offers ways to find joy and connection in small moments.

A fresh start can also happen for a town, in this case an Italian village whose devoted mayor is determined to find a way to save it.

Among the nonfiction selections are a biography of an unheralded archaeologist who discovered the ancient buried city of Alexandria in Egypt, a memoir of a Jordanian-born woman who founded an education program for refugee children in America, and an in-depth look at what caused dinosaurs to die out.

Spring is a time of fresh starts, and many of the books recommended this month amplify that message. From Anna Quindlan’s advice about “Writing for Your Life” to James Crews’ collection of poems, “The Path to Kindness,” these titles will put a little bounce in your step.

1. Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus

“Children, set the table. Your mother needs a moment to herself.” It’s 1961, and these brisk, bold words close “Supper at Six,” America’s hit TV cooking show hosted by Elizabeth Zott. Brilliant and determined, the 30-something chemist would rather work in a research lab; the story of why she does n’t, her efforts de ella to return there, and the social toll of the era’s noxious sexism roils and rivets in this potent debut novel.

Why We Wrote This

Our reviewers’ picks for this month include books about challenging sexism, moving out of complacency, and recognizing the impact of today’s decisions on the future. And, for poetry month, a collection of poems offers ways to find joy and connection in small moments.

2.Sea of ​​Tranquility by Emily St. John Mandel

Gaspery Roberts travels through time, hunting for answers to a mysterious anomaly. Emily St. John Mandel’s new novel, intertwined with, but not dependent upon, her previous one, “The Glass Hotel,” transports readers from British Columbia to New York to the farthest planets. The precariousness of civilization, plus the impact of today’s decisions on tomorrow, receive thoughtful, lyrical treatment.

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