Three Reasons Children Need More Non-Fiction

Presented by: Scholastics & School Library Journal
Event Date and Time: Wednesday, April 27, 2022 | 2:00-3:00 PM ET, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM PT

Join us for a conversation about American History with authors Barbara Binns, Unlawful Orders: A portrait of Dr. James B. Williams, Tuskegee Airman, Surgeon, and Activist, Deborah Hopkinson, The Deadliest Hurricanes Then and Now and Ebony Wilkins, If You Traveled on the Underground Railroad. These three engaging stories will leave readers filled with a greater understanding of the world we live in and deliver the message in a way that speaks profoundly to why it is important for children to read non-fiction.

The Deadliest Hurricanes Then and Now, by Deborah Hopkinson

Perfect for fans of i survived and the whowas series! Packed with graphics, photos, and facts for curious minds, this is a gripping look at America’s deadliest hurricanes.

As a hurricane gathered in the Caribbean, blue skies covered Galveston, Texas. Scientists knew a storm was coming. But none of them were able to prepare Galveston for the force of the hurricane that hit on September 8, 1900.

The water from the storm surges pulled houses off their foundations, and the winds toppled telephone poles and trees like toothpicks. And amid the chaos, Galveston’s residents did all they could to rescue one another.

From the meteorologists tracking the storm, to the ordinary people who displayed extraordinary bravery… from the inequitable effects of the disaster, to a focus on many of the most severe hurricanes that have struck our shores, to the science of hurricanes and weather: Acclaimed Sibert Honor author Deborah Hopkinson brings voices from history to life in this fast-paced, wide-ranging narrative of the deadliest hurricanes in American history. Filled with more than 50 period photographs and illustrations, charts, facts, and pull-out boxes for eager nonfiction readers.

If You Traveled on the Underground Railroad, by Ebony Wilkins

What if you lived in a different time and place? What would you wear? What would you eat? How would your daily life be different?

Scholastic’s If You Lived… series answers all of kids’ most important questions about events in American history. With a question and answer format, kid-friendly artwork, and engaging information, this series is the perfect partner for the classroom and for history-loving readers.

How did the Underground Railroad get its name? Why is it called a railroad? How did people find it? Who operated it?

Ebony Joy Wilkins answers all these questions and more in this comprehensive guide to the Underground Railroad. A great choice for Civil War units, and for teaching children about this important part of American history.

Unlawful Orders: A Portrait of Dr. James B. Williams, Tuskegee Airman, Surgeon, and Activist, by Barbara Binns

Barbara Binns presents the inspiring story of one man in his struggle for racial equality in the field of battle and the field of medicine.

The Tuskegee Airmen heroically fought for the right to be officers of the US military so that they might participate in World War II by flying overseas to help defeat fascism. However, after winning that battle, they faced their next great challenge at Freeman Field, Iowa, where racist white officers barred them from entering the prestigious Officers’ Club that their rank promised them. The Freeman Field Mutiny, as it became known, would eventually lead to the desegregation of the US armed forces, forever changing the course of American history and race relations.

One Black officer who refused to give in to the mustache at Freeman Field was James Buchanan “JB” Williams. JB grew up the son of sharecroppers, but his loving family and insuppressible intellect drove him to push boundaries placed on Black Americans in the early twentieth century. JB’s devotion to the betterment of others took him from the classroom where he learned to be a doctor, to serving as a medic in the US military and eventually joining the elite Tuskegee Airmen, where he fought to change the minds of all who believed Black men couldn’t make good soldiers. But JB’s greatest contribution to him came in his role as doctor and Civil Rights activist after the war, where he continued to push past injustices placed on Black Americans.

Critically acclaimed author Barbara Binns tells the story of one man’s remarkable life, and in doing so, explores the trials of the brave Black freedom fighters who defended the world against racism and bigotry, both on the front lines and at home.

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