YWCA “Women of Vision,” Legacy

Retirement is a time when people slow down; that is, unless you’re wired like Wanda Starke.“Service is the price you pay for rent on this earth,” Wanda says, adding, that’s one of her favorite quotes from her. The YWCA is honoring Wanda with the Women of Vision Legacy award; an award that seems ever so fitting for someone who has built her life around service here in the Triad. Wanda joined the WXII News Team in January of 1994, lighting up the screen for decades. It was Wanda who started the segment “A Place To Call Home,” helping kids find families forever. This is more than a cause for Wanda, she considers it her calling her. “I was adopted as a child and I believe that every child deserves a permanent, safe, loving home,” Wanda says. Wanda has been an inspiration to many through the years, In 2011, she traveled to Africa, visiting five orphanages to help feed abandoned babies in Kenya. The trip highlighted the work of the Ahmani Children’s Foundation, a non-profit based out of Winston Salem. Her service from her has not gone unnoticed. Wanda received the President’s Award for Volunteer Service as well as the Maya Angelou Women Who Lead Excellence Award. Wanda who is used to being on the move all the time, says Covid really forced her to stop and think. “One of the lessons I learned is how important family is… when I have time with them now, I just treasure it,” Wanda says. Now that the world is back in motion, Wanda is excited to get back to doing what she loves. “I want to travel more, I want to write more…at my core, I am a storyteller and I love to tell other people’s stories,” Wanda says. The next story she plans to tell is already in the works. Wanda is working on a children’s book on adoption. She wants to write about a book that helps adopted kids answer some of the questions they may have, questions she herself had as a child. Just another interesting chapter in the story, that is, Wanda Starke’s life of her. Wanda Starke — a woman with a vision — and a laser-like focus. “What is my vision? I want to do good, and be good, and be the best that I can,” she says.

Retirement is a time when people slow down; that is, unless you’re wired like Wanda Starke.

“Service is the price you pay for rent on this earth,” Wanda says, adding, that’s one of her favorite quotes.

The YWCA is honoring Wanda with the Women of Vision Legacy award; an award that seems ever so fitting for someone who has built her life around service here in the Triad.

Wanda joined the WXII News Team in January of 1994, lighting up the screen for decades. It was Wanda who started the segment “A Place To Call Home,” helping kids find families forever. This is more than a cause for Wanda, she considers it her calling her.

“I was adopted as a child and I believe that every child deserves a permanent, safe, loving home,” Wanda says.

Wanda has been an inspiration to many through the years, In 2011, she traveled to Africa, visiting five orphanages to help feed abandoned babies in Kenya. The trip highlighted the work of the Ahmani Children’s Foundation, a non-profit based out of Winston Salem.

Her service has not gone unnoticed. Wanda received the President’s Award for Volunteer Service as well as the Maya Angelou Women Who Lead Excellence Award.

Wanda who is used to being on the move all the time, says Covid really forced her to stop and think.

“One of the lessons I learned is how important family is… when I have time with them now, I just treasure it,” Wanda says.

Now that the world is back in motion, Wanda is excited to get back to doing what she loves.

“I want to travel more, I want to write more…at my core, I am a storyteller and I love to tell other people’s stories,” Wanda says.

The next story she plans to tell is already in the works. Wanda is working on a children’s book on adoption. She wants to write about a book that helps adopted kids answer some of the questions they may have, questions she herself had as a child.

Just another interesting chapter in the story, that is, Wanda Starke’s life.

Wanda Starke — a woman with a vision — and a laser-like focus.

“What is my vision? I want to do good, and be good, and be the best that I can,” she says.

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